Archive for the 'General' Category

Social Competence Predicts Life Outcomes

Social competence
The prestigious American Journal of Public Health published a study in July 2015 that supports the development of social-emotional learning as a public health mandate.

753 kindergarteners from low socioeconomic neighborhoods were rated by their teachers on social competence and followed by Jones et al for 19 years (to approximately age 25) to determine outcomes in education, employment, public assistance, crime, mental health and substance use.

Social competence was measured by such characteristics as “cooperates with peers without prompting,” “is helpful to others,” “very good at understanding feelings,” and “resolves problems on own.”

Even after taking into consideration gender, race, number of parents in the home, socioeconomic status, early childhood aggression, early academic ability and other factors, social competence in kindergarten predicted:

  • graduation from high school on time
  • completion of a college degree
  • stable or full-time employment in young adulthood
  • less use of special education services
  • fewer repeated grades in high school
  • less use of or requests for public housing or public assistance
  • less involvement with police or detainment before adulthood
  • less likelihood of arrest or appearing in court, and fewer arrests for a severe offense in young adulthood
  • fewer days of binge drinking or marijuana use
  • fewer years on medication for emotional or behavioral issues through high school

Social-emotional learning can be effectively facilitated through supportive arts experiences informed by mental health practices because they are experiential, engaging, embodied and, thus, enduring (Petty and Caccioppo).

The arts are also uniquely able to enhance positive emotions, which builds social connection, despite racial and cultural differences (Frederickson).

Shared creative experiences can deepen possibilities for reflection and meaningful dialogue, in an organic process that develops empathy and empowerment (Freire).

The synchrony that occurs in arts experiences (whether singing the same note, doing the same movement, accepting an idea and running with it as in improvisational theater, or simple eye contact) is a form of empathic communication that develops social competence (Kokal).

References

Frederickson BL.  Are you getting enough positivity in your diet?
http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/are_you_getting_enough_positivity_in_your_diet

Frederickson BL.  How Positive Emotions Heal.  Presentation delivered at the International Research Congress on Integrative Medicine and Health 2012 on16 May 2012, 8:15 AM-9:00 AM. http://webcast.ircimh.org/portal.

Freire P.  Education for Critical Consciousness.  London: Bloomsbury Academic, 1974

Jones DE, Greenberg M, and Crowley M.  Early social-emotional functioning and public health: the relationship between kindergarten social competence and future wellness.  American Journal of Public Health.  Published online ahead of print July 16, 2015: e1-e8.  doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302630, http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302630

Kokal I, Engel A, Kirschner S, and Keysers C.  Synchronized Drumming Enhances Activity in the Caudate and Facilitates Prosocial Commitment – If the Rhythm Comes Easily. PLoS ONE 6(11): e27272, 2011.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027272, http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0027272

Petty RE and Caccioppo JT. Communication and Persuasion: Central and Peripheral Routes to Attitude Change. New York: Springer-Verlag,1986.

Re-Write Your Life

Mindset Book 3

A New York Times blog by Tara Parker-Pope offers examples of studies that show how changing your narrative can change the trajectory of your life.   Scroll down to see the blog.

The examples that she cites suggest that changing one’s story contributes to a growth mindset that is associated with learning and achievement.

According to Carol Dweck, of the Stanford University Department of Psychology, those with growth mindsets seek challenges for an opportunity to learn and those with fixed mindsets of intelligence avoid challenges that lead to self-judgment.

Research from Dweck’s lab has shown that exposure to even simple messages (e.g., “You must have tried really hard”) can have a profound effect on academic performance, and that parental messages heard by children from ages 1-3 determine their mindsets by ages 7-8.

When we re-write our stories, not only do we change our mindsets, but also we visualize new outcomes, which register in the brain as if real, hardwire us for new behavior, and can even change our memory of past events.

Click here to view a TED Talk by Carol Dweck.

Click here if you are interested in a teleseminar on re-writing your life, which will enable participation from far and near from the comfort of home.

Blog post by Tara Parker-Pope

The scientific research on the benefits of so-called expressive writing is surprisingly vast. Studies have shown that writing about oneself and personal experiences can improve mood disorders, help reduce symptoms among cancer patients, improve a person’s health after a heart attack, reduce doctor visits and even boost memory.

Now researchers are studying whether the power of writing — and then rewriting — your personal story can lead to behavioral changes and improve happiness.

The concept is based on the idea that we all have a personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves. But sometimes our inner voice doesn’t get it completely right. Some researchers believe that by writing and then editing our own stories, we can change our perceptions of ourselves and identify obstacles that stand in the way of better health.  Read More… Continue reading ‘Re-Write Your Life’

Stories Can Drive Social Change – We Want Yours

animal conference FINAL_centered_imagePURPLE

On February 7, 2015, a cardiologist, integrative veterinarian, author and storyteller shared their personal, transformational stories of healing choices and end-of-life care.  They spoke about the elephant in the room.  The experience was profound for everyone.

Why did we organize this program?  My experience of the effectiveness of holistic treatment options in animal care made me wonder whypeople can’t have these options.  As integrative veterinary medicine involves less regulation, I wondered if exposure to these practices could motivate PET OWNERS to drive the HUMAN integrative medicine movement through their stories and advocacy.

The other reason that I organized this program is because the therapeutic uses of the arts are a branch of integrative medicine, and I saw an opportunity to demonstrate the relevance of the arts in health policy and practices.  Time and again we see in our community writing programs the power of stories to elicit emotions and facilitate meaningful dialogue.

We encourage you to add your voice to the movement for choices in healing and more humane approaches to end-of-life care.  Your story can make a difference.  If you have one to share, please send it to info@uclartsandhealing.org.  We are also collecting them on behalf of Dr. Richard Palmquist, who will post them on the website of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation in order to fuel the proliferation of research.  As he noted in his presentation, when patients hear that “there is no evidence” for a particular treatment, it does not necessarily mean that things do not work; it means that there is no research to support the intervention.

Some resources for your preparing your story:

Barbara Clark will be teaching a workshop on Finding Meaning in Love and Loss as a follow up to this program, where you will learn how to craft an effective story that is imbued with meaning.  You will leave with a complete story imbued with meaning for yourself and your audience.Click here for details.

Barbara Abercrombie’s blog that includes writing tips and exercises: www.BarbaraAbercrombie.com.

Special Message from Richard Palmquist, DVM:

If you have a story involving the benefits of integrative veterinary care, please consider writing it and sending it to me at this email address, cahdogcat@aol.com. These stories are incredibly helpful for those trapped in a disease cycle and having nowhere to turn. Upon discovering one successful outcome, a dedicated animal guardian may then find the path to assist their friend in recovering or improving its state of health.

The AHVMF, the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation, at www.AHVMF.org is dedicated to expanding humane research and education in integrative and holistic veterinary medicine. Through our work we are supporting important steps to improve health care options for both people and animals. To see how we use these stories go to our website and look at the “Inspiring Stories” and “Animal Teachers” links.

——–

The following are links to books from our Feb. 7 event: Love and Loss: The Power of Stories in Healing Choices and End-of-Life Care

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz’s website: www.zoobiquity.com.

Link to her book: Zoobiquity: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health  http://www.amazon.com/Zoobiquity-Astonishing-Connection-Between-Animal/dp/0307477436.

Barbara Abercrombie’s blog that includes writing tips and exercises: www.BarbaraAbercrombie.com.
Link to her book: Cherished: 21 Writers on Animals They Have Loved and Lost  http://www.amazon.com/Cherished-Writers-Animals-They-Loved/dp/1577319575/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1423898820&sr=1-2&keywords=cherished   All royalties will be donated to Best Friends Animal Society.  Includes stories by Anne Lamott, Jane Smiley, Jacqueline Winspear, Carolyn See, Mark Doty, and more.

(Barbara Abercrombie’s husband Robert Adams died on February 10th.)

Dr. Richard Palmquist’s Centinela Animal Hospital website: www.LovAPet.com.

Link to his book: Releasing Your Pet’s Hidden Health Potential  http://www.amazon.com/Releasing-Your-Hidden-Health-Potential/dp/1449908446/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1423899576&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=palmquist+unleashing+your

Ping Ho, Founding Director, UCLArts and Healing

How Body Language and Thought Affect Our Social Power

DeborahGruenfeld

In less than 100 milliseconds, people decide whether or not they should pay attention to you.

Deborah Gruenfeld, social psychologist and Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, explains in her video on “Acting with Power” that the vast majority of social meaning comes from nonverbal behavior (body language and how things are said) that is typically outside of our realm of awareness.  Actual words only account for 7% of social cues.  

When verbal and nonverbal messages are misaligned, guess what people will remember?  What your body told us.

Group members that have higher social status use their bodies in more expansive ways.

In her video, Gruenfeld offers an experiment to demonstrate how our bodies also affect the way we feel about ourselves.

These exercises underscore the importance of aligning body and mind to support success.  Mind affects body and body affects mind.

Try out the experiential exercises that Deborah Gruenfeld offers in her video presentation.

Activities to deepen the meaning of holidays and special occasions

UCLArts and Healing offered two activities to deepen the meaning of the holidays, that can be used any time of year.

Gifts from the Heart – Art Activity 2014.pdf

Learn to make meaning through a time capsule in this activity offered by art therapist and marriage and family therapist, Erica Curtis.

Gifts from the Heart – Writing Activity 2014.pdf

Write about light as a metaphor to express how you feel or how you feel about someone special in this writing activity by poetry therapist and marriage and family therapist, Perie Longo.

UCLA Integrative Medicine Conference 2014: Creative Arts Therapies Panel

Click here to view the creative arts therapies panel.

Integrative Medicine in the Community through the Creative Arts Therapies:  Experiential Panel Presentations on Creative Arts Therapies at the UCLA Integrative Medicine Conference – March 1, 2014

The creative arts therapies offer accessible, nonverbal and universal tools for facilitating emotional and physical health through a focus on the process of expression, rather than performance or product. The creative arts therapies can offer a humanizing complement to increasingly technological medical care, that can enhance the environment of medicine and address the increasing societal health care burden from chronic diseases rooted in emotions and behavior.

A panel of clinician/scholars from four creative arts therapy disciplines (art therapy, dance/movement therapy, drama therapy, and music therapy) demonstrate how and why the creative arts therapies are so effective as an integrative medicine discipline.  This remarkable presentation features the layering on of each art form in an experiential presentation.

The 2014 Conference for Integrative Medicine panel presenters include:

Ping Ho, MA, MPH (Moderator) – Founding Director, UCLArts and Healing; Steering Committee member, UCLA Collaborative Centers for Integrative Medicine; member of the Council of Advisers for the Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care.

Erica Curtis, MFT, ATR-BC – Past President of the Southern California Art Therapy Association; past board member of the American Art Therapy Association; Instructor at Loyola Marymount University Department of Marital and Family Therapy with specialized training in Clinical Art Therapy.  Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Board Certified Art Therapist

John Mews, MA, MTA, MFT Registered Intern – Executive Director and Founder: Mewsic Moves; Board Certified Music Therapist, Marriage and Family Therapy Registered Intern; Special Needs Family and Parenting Coach.

Mimi Savage
, PhD Candidate, RDT – Southern California Chapter President of the North American Drama Therapy Association; Registered Drama Therapist; Drama Therapy Fund Professional Research Grant Recipient for 2014; Instructor for UCLArts and Healing SEA Program.

Lora Wilson Mau, MA, BC-DMT – President of the California Chapter of the American Dance Therapy Association; Lecturer at California State University, Long Beach, Department of Dance.  Board Certified Dance/Movement Therapist.

Improvisation sparks communication

 

Dan Klein

Life is an improvisation. No one hands you a script at the start of your day.

Dan Klein is an expert in improvisational communication and creative problem solving.  In this video, Going Beyond “Hello,” he explores the improvisational principle of “yes-and,” or accepting the offers of others, and how it applies to our daily lives. He describes the spirit of improvisation as “alive and in the moment” creativity.

Klein is the head of improv in the drama department at Stanford University and teaches at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Platner Institute for Design. He has taught improvisational communication and creative problem solving at companies like Cisco, Visa, BlackRock, and Nestle. A former dean of Bay Area Theater Sports School, Klein is also a founding member of the award-winning comedy group Kasper Hauser. Klein is co-author of three comedy books, including Obama’s Blackberry. Klein earned his degree in Cognition and Creativity from Stanford.

Click here to view the TEDxStanford talk on Going Beyond “Hello.”

Click here to read a Stanford Daily interview with Dan Klein, on how he became a professional improviser and how you can become one, too.

Dan Klein, and colleagues Tad Glauthier and Al Samuels, offer 7 improv and acting techniques to make your presentations more memorable.

The State of the Art and Science in Creative Arts Therapies—with a Focus on Treatment of Trauma

View the panel presentation on “The State of the Art and Science in Creative Arts Therapies—with a Focus on Treatment of Trauma” orchestrated by UCLArts and Healing for the major International Research Conference on Integrative Medicine and Health in 2012:

Click here to view the video.


view video


This panel discussion, which took place at the 2012 International Research Conference on Integrative Medicine and Health, begins with a state of the art review of current research and the goals and issues of ongoing research by moderator, Jeremy Nobel, MD, MPH. Five distinguished clinicians and scholars from four creative arts therapy disciplines (art therapy, dance/movement therapy, drama therapy, and music therapy) then present discipline-specific research focused on the treatment of trauma. Panelists also offer a coordinated presentation highlighting underlying paradigms of the creative arts therapies and emerging trends in evidence-informed practice. Selected applications of creative arts therapies, including those in the context of academic health centers and integrative medicine, are illustrated. 

Panel Moderator: 
Jeremy Nobel, MD, MPH
Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Founding Director, Foundation for Art and Healing

Panelists:
Marcia L. Rosal, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM
Professor and Director Art Therapy Program, Florida State University, USA

Sherry Goodill, PhD, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC
Chairperson, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University, USA

Stephen Snow, PhD, RDT-BCT
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Concordia University, Canada

Bryan C. Hunter, PhD, LCAT, MT-BC
Professor and Chair, Dept. of Creative Arts Therapy, Nazareth College

 

View creativity conference videos from spring 2013

Click on the link below to view footage in 18 labeled segments from our April 7, 2013 conference entitled, “On the Edge of Chaos: Finding Flow and Resilience through Creativity & the Arts”.Image

Doctor dances in operating room right before her own double mastectomy

San Francisco gynecologist Deborah Cohan gets her entire surgical team dancing with her to the music of Beyonce at UCSF Hospital before her double mastectomy, and asks others to submit videos of themselves dancing to Beyonce for her to view during recovery.  Cohan specializes in treatment of pregnant women with HIV.

From the article: “I was more nervous about how the flash mob was going to go than how the surgery was going to go,” she said.

Click here to view the ABC News video and story.