Archive for the 'Art' Category

New Online Creative Caregiving Guide

NCCA Creative Caregiving Guide

Imagine a world where every caregiving act for adults with alzheimer’s disease and related cognitive disorders contributes to quality days for both the caregiver and their care partner.

The public is invited to utilize FREE video clips and curriculum materials developed by the National Center for Creative Aging to facilitate cognition, self-expression, movement and social connection in adults living with Alzheimer’s disease and related cognitive disorders.*

The guide is constantly expanding with lessons for additional languages and cultures.

http://creativecaregiving.creativeaging.org/

* Note from Ping Ho, MA, MPH – Founding Director of UCLArts and Healing:

The lessons are applicable to other populations such as special needs and young children.

Activities to deepen the meaning of holidays and special occasions

UCLArts and Healing offered two activities to deepen the meaning of the holidays, that can be used any time of year.

Gifts from the Heart – Art Activity 2014.pdf

Learn to make meaning through a time capsule in this activity offered by art therapist and marriage and family therapist, Erica Curtis.

Gifts from the Heart – Writing Activity 2014.pdf

Write about light as a metaphor to express how you feel or how you feel about someone special in this writing activity by poetry therapist and marriage and family therapist, Perie Longo.

Art therapy life narrative activity for youth with history of trauma

Linda Chapman, MA ATR-BC

Art therapist Linda Chapman shares a technique that she finds increasingly valuable in art therapy with children and teens with a history of developmental or complex trauma. It requires very little media, space, and can be worked on at the child’s pace of comfort.

Autobiographical Life Narrative

Creating an autobiographical life narrative is completed over a number of sessions, sometimes weeks or months.  This requires a roll of paper 12″ x 15-20′ long, resembling a roll of paper towels.

I offer graphite and colored pencils, markers, pastels and paint, but the drawing can be done with any drawing media.   I also have infant stickers depicting infant supplies, toys, and “It’s a Boy” and “It’s a Girl” stickers.  I also have toy catalogues available.

I begin by asking the child if they know where they were born, such as in a hospital or at home, and if they know who was present.  The child may or may not know this, but can find out.  If they do know, I ask them to depict the hospital, those present, and anything else they know about that day.  Then I ask if they heard any stories about themselves as a baby, and do they remember a favorite toy. They find images or draw depictions of what they recall as a young child.  I then ask about day-care, pre-school and other early experiences to stimulate them thinking of their early years.  The images will depict toys, clothes, and important people as well as negative experiences such as domestic violence.  We continue the narrative until it is the present time, which may take many sessions.

As the child works on the visual narrative, it becomes a reference tool for accessing memories, emotions, and thoughts.  The experience also is a vehicle for exploring losses as favorite toys or people and places are remembered.  Another item that I notice appears is the many injustices suffered by children which are seemingly never forgotten.  One of the most useful aspects of the narrative is to use it as a template for remembering when the child began hearing voices, or began cutting.  The depiction of the stressor is often is visual form just before cutting or suicide attempts.  This allows me to normalize the maladaptive coping as an attempt to control emotions.  After doing so, one teen remarked, “This is the first time I have ever understood why I cut.”

I recommend you proceed slowly, and let the child know they can work on the narrative as much or as little as they like at each session.  Often the age of the developmental arrest is when the child stops drawing or working on the narrative.  With gentle encouragement and normalizing of wanting to avoid the painful memories, most children will complete the narrative, but not always.

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Linda Chapman, MA, ATR-BC, is a registered and board certified art therapist and play therapist who directs the Art Therapy Institute of the Redwoods in Northern California, a center for learning and therapy. Linda was affiliated with the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine for 25 years, where she held clinical faculty and research appointments. Linda was a creator and for 10 years directed the UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital Pediatric Play Therapy Program, and has conducted federally funded art therapy outcome research with the UCSF/SFGH Injury Center and Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. Linda is a nationally recognized expert in art therapy and play therapy with children who are victims of violence, child abuse and medical trauma. She is the author of several peer-review papers and has authored and co-authored chapters in Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, California Art Therapy Trends and Group Play Therapy She is a member of the review board of Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association. Linda is an adjunct faculty member of many universities.

L.Chapman@arttherapyredwoods.com
ArtTherapyRedwoods.com

UCLA Integrative Medicine Conference 2014: Creative Arts Therapies Panel

Click here to view the creative arts therapies panel.

Integrative Medicine in the Community through the Creative Arts Therapies:  Experiential Panel Presentations on Creative Arts Therapies at the UCLA Integrative Medicine Conference – March 1, 2014

The creative arts therapies offer accessible, nonverbal and universal tools for facilitating emotional and physical health through a focus on the process of expression, rather than performance or product. The creative arts therapies can offer a humanizing complement to increasingly technological medical care, that can enhance the environment of medicine and address the increasing societal health care burden from chronic diseases rooted in emotions and behavior.

A panel of clinician/scholars from four creative arts therapy disciplines (art therapy, dance/movement therapy, drama therapy, and music therapy) demonstrate how and why the creative arts therapies are so effective as an integrative medicine discipline.  This remarkable presentation features the layering on of each art form in an experiential presentation.

The 2014 Conference for Integrative Medicine panel presenters include:

Ping Ho, MA, MPH (Moderator) – Founding Director, UCLArts and Healing; Steering Committee member, UCLA Collaborative Centers for Integrative Medicine; member of the Council of Advisers for the Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care.

Erica Curtis, MFT, ATR-BC – Past President of the Southern California Art Therapy Association; past board member of the American Art Therapy Association; Instructor at Loyola Marymount University Department of Marital and Family Therapy with specialized training in Clinical Art Therapy.  Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Board Certified Art Therapist

John Mews, MA, MTA, MFT Registered Intern – Executive Director and Founder: Mewsic Moves; Board Certified Music Therapist, Marriage and Family Therapy Registered Intern; Special Needs Family and Parenting Coach.

Mimi Savage
, PhD Candidate, RDT – Southern California Chapter President of the North American Drama Therapy Association; Registered Drama Therapist; Drama Therapy Fund Professional Research Grant Recipient for 2014; Instructor for UCLArts and Healing SEA Program.

Lora Wilson Mau, MA, BC-DMT – President of the California Chapter of the American Dance Therapy Association; Lecturer at California State University, Long Beach, Department of Dance.  Board Certified Dance/Movement Therapist.

The State of the Art and Science in Creative Arts Therapies—with a Focus on Treatment of Trauma

View the panel presentation on “The State of the Art and Science in Creative Arts Therapies—with a Focus on Treatment of Trauma” orchestrated by UCLArts and Healing for the major International Research Conference on Integrative Medicine and Health in 2012:

Click here to view the video.


view video


This panel discussion, which took place at the 2012 International Research Conference on Integrative Medicine and Health, begins with a state of the art review of current research and the goals and issues of ongoing research by moderator, Jeremy Nobel, MD, MPH. Five distinguished clinicians and scholars from four creative arts therapy disciplines (art therapy, dance/movement therapy, drama therapy, and music therapy) then present discipline-specific research focused on the treatment of trauma. Panelists also offer a coordinated presentation highlighting underlying paradigms of the creative arts therapies and emerging trends in evidence-informed practice. Selected applications of creative arts therapies, including those in the context of academic health centers and integrative medicine, are illustrated. 

Panel Moderator: 
Jeremy Nobel, MD, MPH
Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Founding Director, Foundation for Art and Healing

Panelists:
Marcia L. Rosal, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM
Professor and Director Art Therapy Program, Florida State University, USA

Sherry Goodill, PhD, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC
Chairperson, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University, USA

Stephen Snow, PhD, RDT-BCT
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Concordia University, Canada

Bryan C. Hunter, PhD, LCAT, MT-BC
Professor and Chair, Dept. of Creative Arts Therapy, Nazareth College

 

View creativity conference videos from spring 2013

Click on the link below to view footage in 18 labeled segments from our April 7, 2013 conference entitled, “On the Edge of Chaos: Finding Flow and Resilience through Creativity & the Arts”.Image

Gifts from the Heart: Self-Guided Arts Activities

As our holiday gift to you, three creative arts therapists have provided activities centered on the topic of giving that can be done individually, or with family and friends. These self-guided activities are intended to help deepen the meaning of the holidays and reduce stress.  They also demonstrate how the process of creative expression can be used to bring meaning, self-understanding, empathy, connection to others, and other benefits.

Gifts from the Heart – Writing Activity.pdf

Gifts from the Heart – Art Activity.pdf

Gifts From the Heart – Movement Activity.pdf

Look for more self-guided activities in our e-newsletters in 2014!

Free audio archive for creative arts therapies

The audio archive for creative arts therapies, sponsored by the Expressive Therapies Summit & Expressive Media’s Institute of the Arts in Healing, gives voice to creative arts therapists and inspiration to students and consumers.

Creative arts therapists may upload up to 2-minutes and 30 seconds of an inspiring story about what they do.

Students and consumers can learn from real professionals about the fields of art therapy, dance/movement therapy, drama therapy/psychodrama, music therapy, poetry therapy/bibliotherapy, story/narrative/journaling, expressive arts therapy, and play/sand play therapy.

Click here to listen to, or post in, the audio archives.

Four Air Force captains empower Afghani and other women by creating a nonprofit to bring their artisan handiwork to America.

Artisan handiwork can change not only the lives of artists but also the people trying to help them.

Four US Air Force captains, inspired by artisan widows in Afghanistan, have created the nonprofit, Flying Scarves, to empower women throughout the world.

In order to rebuild these communities, we’re going to have to empower people…And the people who don’t typically have access to capital, money and jobs are women. — Capt. Josh Carroll.

Click here to view the ABC newscast and read the heartwarming story.

Creative arts therapies in a nutshell: video clips of experiential demonstrations of art, dance/movement, drama, music, and poetry therapies

At the 2013 UCLA Integrative Medicine Conference, UCLArts and Healing presented a panel of leading clinician/scholars from five creative arts therapy disciplines (in art, dance/movement, drama, music, and poetry), who each offered an experiential demonstration of the principles of their work, as well as explained the nature of their discipline and training requirements.

Creative arts therapists are professionally educated in both mental health and the arts. They are trained in a variety of approaches with different populations and are able to develop individualized assessment and treatment plans. Rather than focusing on the product, they focus on the process of creative expression, which evokes unconscious information that is reflected upon for insight, self-awareness, and behavior change.

Click on the links below to view footage from the 10″ presentations.  You will see an entire auditorium of people on its feet, dancing.

Introduction to the Creative Arts Therapies – by Ping Ho, MA, MPH and Poetry Therapy – by Robert Carroll, MD

Art Therapy – by Erica Curtis, LMFT, ATR-BC

Dance/Movement Therapy – by Lora Wilson Mau, MA, BC-DMT

Drama Therapy – by Pam Dunne, PhD, RDT/BCT

Music Therapy – by Judith Pinkerton MT-BC/L

Panel Question and Answer Session

Click here for power point slides from each of the presentations.