Archive for March, 2015

Re-Write Your Life

Mindset Book 3

A New York Times blog by Tara Parker-Pope offers examples of studies that show how changing your narrative can change the trajectory of your life.   Scroll down to see the blog.

The examples that she cites suggest that changing one’s story contributes to a growth mindset that is associated with learning and achievement.

According to Carol Dweck, of the Stanford University Department of Psychology, those with growth mindsets seek challenges for an opportunity to learn and those with fixed mindsets of intelligence avoid challenges that lead to self-judgment.

Research from Dweck’s lab has shown that exposure to even simple messages (e.g., “You must have tried really hard”) can have a profound effect on academic performance, and that parental messages heard by children from ages 1-3 determine their mindsets by ages 7-8.

When we re-write our stories, not only do we change our mindsets, but also we visualize new outcomes, which register in the brain as if real, hardwire us for new behavior, and can even change our memory of past events.

Click here to view a TED Talk by Carol Dweck.

Click here if you are interested in a teleseminar on re-writing your life, which will enable participation from far and near from the comfort of home.

Blog post by Tara Parker-Pope

The scientific research on the benefits of so-called expressive writing is surprisingly vast. Studies have shown that writing about oneself and personal experiences can improve mood disorders, help reduce symptoms among cancer patients, improve a person’s health after a heart attack, reduce doctor visits and even boost memory.

Now researchers are studying whether the power of writing — and then rewriting — your personal story can lead to behavioral changes and improve happiness.

The concept is based on the idea that we all have a personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves. But sometimes our inner voice doesn’t get it completely right. Some researchers believe that by writing and then editing our own stories, we can change our perceptions of ourselves and identify obstacles that stand in the way of better health.  Read More… Continue reading ‘Re-Write Your Life’

Stories Can Drive Social Change – We Want Yours

animal conference FINAL_centered_imagePURPLE

On February 7, 2015, a cardiologist, integrative veterinarian, author and storyteller shared their personal, transformational stories of healing choices and end-of-life care.  They spoke about the elephant in the room.  The experience was profound for everyone.

Why did we organize this program?  My experience of the effectiveness of holistic treatment options in animal care made me wonder whypeople can’t have these options.  As integrative veterinary medicine involves less regulation, I wondered if exposure to these practices could motivate PET OWNERS to drive the HUMAN integrative medicine movement through their stories and advocacy.

The other reason that I organized this program is because the therapeutic uses of the arts are a branch of integrative medicine, and I saw an opportunity to demonstrate the relevance of the arts in health policy and practices.  Time and again we see in our community writing programs the power of stories to elicit emotions and facilitate meaningful dialogue.

We encourage you to add your voice to the movement for choices in healing and more humane approaches to end-of-life care.  Your story can make a difference.  If you have one to share, please send it to info@uclartsandhealing.org.  We are also collecting them on behalf of Dr. Richard Palmquist, who will post them on the website of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation in order to fuel the proliferation of research.  As he noted in his presentation, when patients hear that “there is no evidence” for a particular treatment, it does not necessarily mean that things do not work; it means that there is no research to support the intervention.

Some resources for your preparing your story:

Barbara Clark will be teaching a workshop on Finding Meaning in Love and Loss as a follow up to this program, where you will learn how to craft an effective story that is imbued with meaning.  You will leave with a complete story imbued with meaning for yourself and your audience.Click here for details.

Barbara Abercrombie’s blog that includes writing tips and exercises: www.BarbaraAbercrombie.com.

Special Message from Richard Palmquist, DVM:

If you have a story involving the benefits of integrative veterinary care, please consider writing it and sending it to me at this email address, cahdogcat@aol.com. These stories are incredibly helpful for those trapped in a disease cycle and having nowhere to turn. Upon discovering one successful outcome, a dedicated animal guardian may then find the path to assist their friend in recovering or improving its state of health.

The AHVMF, the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation, at www.AHVMF.org is dedicated to expanding humane research and education in integrative and holistic veterinary medicine. Through our work we are supporting important steps to improve health care options for both people and animals. To see how we use these stories go to our website and look at the “Inspiring Stories” and “Animal Teachers” links.

——–

The following are links to books from our Feb. 7 event: Love and Loss: The Power of Stories in Healing Choices and End-of-Life Care

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz’s website: www.zoobiquity.com.

Link to her book: Zoobiquity: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health  http://www.amazon.com/Zoobiquity-Astonishing-Connection-Between-Animal/dp/0307477436.

Barbara Abercrombie’s blog that includes writing tips and exercises: www.BarbaraAbercrombie.com.
Link to her book: Cherished: 21 Writers on Animals They Have Loved and Lost  http://www.amazon.com/Cherished-Writers-Animals-They-Loved/dp/1577319575/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1423898820&sr=1-2&keywords=cherished   All royalties will be donated to Best Friends Animal Society.  Includes stories by Anne Lamott, Jane Smiley, Jacqueline Winspear, Carolyn See, Mark Doty, and more.

(Barbara Abercrombie’s husband Robert Adams died on February 10th.)

Dr. Richard Palmquist’s Centinela Animal Hospital website: www.LovAPet.com.

Link to his book: Releasing Your Pet’s Hidden Health Potential  http://www.amazon.com/Releasing-Your-Hidden-Health-Potential/dp/1449908446/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1423899576&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=palmquist+unleashing+your

Ping Ho, Founding Director, UCLArts and Healing

How Body Language and Thought Affect Our Social Power

DeborahGruenfeld

In less than 100 milliseconds, people decide whether or not they should pay attention to you.

Deborah Gruenfeld, social psychologist and Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, explains in her video on “Acting with Power” that the vast majority of social meaning comes from nonverbal behavior (body language and how things are said) that is typically outside of our realm of awareness.  Actual words only account for 7% of social cues.  

When verbal and nonverbal messages are misaligned, guess what people will remember?  What your body told us.

Group members that have higher social status use their bodies in more expansive ways.

In her video, Gruenfeld offers an experiment to demonstrate how our bodies also affect the way we feel about ourselves.

These exercises underscore the importance of aligning body and mind to support success.  Mind affects body and body affects mind.

Try out the experiential exercises that Deborah Gruenfeld offers in her video presentation.