Archive for July, 2014

Improvisation sparks communication

 

Dan Klein

Life is an improvisation. No one hands you a script at the start of your day.

Dan Klein is an expert in improvisational communication and creative problem solving.  In this video, Going Beyond “Hello,” he explores the improvisational principle of “yes-and,” or accepting the offers of others, and how it applies to our daily lives. He describes the spirit of improvisation as “alive and in the moment” creativity.

Klein is the head of improv in the drama department at Stanford University and teaches at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Platner Institute for Design. He has taught improvisational communication and creative problem solving at companies like Cisco, Visa, BlackRock, and Nestle. A former dean of Bay Area Theater Sports School, Klein is also a founding member of the award-winning comedy group Kasper Hauser. Klein is co-author of three comedy books, including Obama’s Blackberry. Klein earned his degree in Cognition and Creativity from Stanford.

Click here to view the TEDxStanford talk on Going Beyond “Hello.”

Click here to read a Stanford Daily interview with Dan Klein, on how he became a professional improviser and how you can become one, too.

Dan Klein, and colleagues Tad Glauthier and Al Samuels, offer 7 improv and acting techniques to make your presentations more memorable.

Dance/Movement therapy for hospitalized kids

Lori Baudino

Lori Baudino, PsyD, BC-DMT is a licensed clinical psychologist and board-certified dance/movement therapist who brought the first dance/movement therapy programs to Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles through funding by The Andréa Rizzo Foundation (for Dréa’s Dream pediatric dance therapy programming).

Click here to view a TED-style talk by Dr. Baudino describing the experiences of hospitalized children and how dance/movement therapy meets their needs (sponsored by the American Dance Therapy Association).

Click here to view a UCLA Health website article featuring Dr. Baudino describing how she works with children in the hospital, how she got connected with Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA, and a particularly memorable experience.

Click here to view footage of Dr. Baudino doing dance/movement therapy with children at Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA.

Music improves behavior and memory in Alzheimer’s patients

VitalSigns_Spr14_Music2

The UCLA Tunes for Alzheimer’s Patients program provides music to residents of nursing homes to improve memory and behavior, such as depression, apathy, agitation frustration, poor eating, and difficulty sleeping.   This program is a collaboration between the Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research at UCLA and a national nonprofit organization, Music & Memory.

The program seeks donations of ipods and mp3 players, itunes gift cards, headphones, and other audio-related equipment..

Click here to read the UCLA Vital Signs publication on the Tunes for Alzheimer’s Patients program in which Joshua Grill, PhD (assistant professor of neurology and director of the Katherine and Benjamin Kagan Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Development Program at UCLA’s Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research) shares what is known about the therapeutic benefits of music or patients with forms of dementia.

Click here to view the companion video that features an interview with Dr. Grill, some patients and their partners.

Click here to view a video clip of a man with Alzheimer’s who becomes verbally responsive upon hearing his favorite music on an ipod. This clip is from the documentary film, Alive inside.

Movement and music therapies for autism

Christina Devereux  site

The American Dance Therapy Association is building a Youtube channel that will include TED-type talks about dance/movement therapy with different populations.

The first of the videos was posted in honor of Autism Awareness Month: a 12-minute talk about dance/movement therapy and autism by Christina Devereaux, PhD, LCAT, LMHC, BC-DMT, NCC, who eloquently describes the capacity of dance /movement therapy to produce treatment outcomes in the area of social relationships, and particularly in their formation. Understanding bodily cues and joining in those movements enables a playful dialogue of movement that leads to connection. Then behavior patterns can be channeled towards social engagement. Click here to view the video on dance/movement therapy and autism.

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Click here to view a short and fun video demonstration on how rhythm and movement go together by board-certified music therapist, Kat Fulton.

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Click here to read the full 2013 review article from Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, entitled: A review of “music and movement” therapies for children with autism: embodied interventions for multisystem development. 

Authors Srinivasan and Bhat from the University of Connecticut summarized their research in the abstract below:

The rising incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) has led to a surge in the number of children needing autism interventions. This paper is a call to clinicians to diversify autism interventions and to promote the use of embodied music-based approaches to facilitate multisystem development. Approximately 12% of all autism interventions and 45% of all alternative treatment strategies in schools involve music-based activities. Musical training impacts various forms of development including communication, social-emotional, and motor development in children with ASDs and other developmental disorders as well as typically developing children. In this review, we will highlight the multisystem impairments of ASDs, explain why music and movement therapies are a powerful clinical tool, as well as describe mechanisms and offer evidence in support of music therapies for children with ASDs. We will support our claims by reviewing results from brain imaging studies reporting on music therapy effects in children with autism. We will also discuss the critical elements and the different types of music therapy approaches commonly used in pediatric neurological populations including autism. We provide strong arguments for the use of music and movement interventions as a multisystem treatment tool for children with ASDs. Finally, we also make recommendations for assessment and treatment of children with ASDs, and provide directions for future research.